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What to Expect From My Portrait Retouching | Columbus Senior Photographer

Most of my high school senior clients ask if I’m able to clean up their skin in portrait retouching. And the answer is always, “Yes. Of course!”


I actually include basic retouching for every client, whether requested or not, as a complimentary service. I do more of a “polishing” of each image, so the results are subtle while still keeping the integrity of the client intact.


So if you’re planning a session with me or are just curious about what’s included in the retouching process, this post should answer some of those burning questions. And you’ll see side-by-side examples of my editing, so you’ll know what to expect.



After My Portrait Retouching

Before My Portrait Retouching
Before My Portrait Retouching



What I Include In Portrait Retouching


I always clean up three key areas during the portrait retouching process. Those are skin, eyes, and distractions. Beyond that, I’ll edit as necessary to please the client.


I aim to keep retouching subtle and natural, so the client still looks like themselves but the version we all see on their best day!



portrait retouching of high school senior photo


1. Skin


It’s important to me to maintain integrity in skin tones and texture. I remove things that are temporary blemishes, like acne or bruises. But for permanent scars, moles, or birthmarks, I ask the client specifically what level of retouching they want.


Skin Retouching Includes:

Blemish Removal

Skin Tone Balancing

Oil and Shine Removal

Skin Softening (lightly, as needed)

Skin Brightening (as needed)



portrait retouching of high school senior photo
Subtle is key! I smoothed out her skin a little, and that's it!


Right photo is the final edit. I polished up skin tones, a small bruise on her arm, and cleaned up my reflector in the bottom left corner.




2. Eyes


Since eyes are the focal point of a portrait, I always do some retouching to make them pop!


This includes a bit of sharpening and brightening of the eyes. Occasionally, I’ll also brighten up under the eyes and the T-zone. Like all of my editing, this is a very subtle process.


Eye Retouching Includes:

Sharpening eyelashes

Brightening of eyes

Brightening under the eyes

Lightening around the eye socket and bridge of the nose (T–Zone)



portrait retouching process of columbus ohio senior
I brighted up eyes, T-Zone, and smoothed out skin blemishes in this photo. Right photo is final edit.

portrait retouching photos of high school senior girl
Here I've brighted up her eyes and evened out skin tones on her hands. Right photo is the final edit.


3. Distraction Removal and Cleanup


Having the ability to remove distractions is one of the best features of digital editing! Here’s how I use it for portrait retouching.


Distraction Retouching Includes:

Remove unwanted people or objects from the background

Smooth out wrinkled clothing

Clean up lint on clothing

Extending backgrounds when needed



portrait of high school senior in westerville ohio
Can you spot the background distractions I removed from this photo? The top photo is not edited.


In the portrait below, I smoothed out her skin, brightened her eyes, and cleaned up parts of her hair. The necklace was a sentimental piece to her, so I left it for her portraits, but removed it when I entered it into a contest.

three portraits of columbus ohio senior



two portrait of high school senior guy showing portrait retouching process

Sometimes clothes can bulge if they’re stiff like this shirt did. And sometimes there’s no fixing it before taking the photo. That’s where editing comes in handy!




At this point, after editing skin, eyes, and distractions, each portrait is pretty polished. But in some circumstances, I will do additional portrait retouching for hair and skin wrinkles.



Hair


I often clean up the hair of my female clients. I’ll edit the hair for cleanup if it's an outdoor portrait. I never edit hair so much that it looks like the person was cut and pasted into the background. Some stray hairs make it look more natural.


Sometimes I’ll change the shape of hair, fix curls, or fill in gaps to make the hair look full. But 90% of hair editing is to remove stray hair flyaways.



Hair Retouching Includes:

Remove stray hairs or flyaways

Fill in gaps or slightly change the shape to make the hair appear fuller




side by side portrait showing portrait retouching
I curled some of Abby’s hair in this photo. It wasn’t something that was necessary, but it made her hair look fuller, so I went for it!

portrait retouching of high school senior in columbus ohio
Right photo is the final edit. I polished her skin, brightened eyes, and cleaned up some flyaway hairs. I didn't remove them all, because it wouldn't have looked natural if I did.




Wrinkles


Wrinkles can be a touchy subject when it comes to portrait retouching. In a world where we see flawless skin in the media, it’s easy to think we should wipe away all evidence of wrinkles. But I have a different point of view.


Smile lines and forehead wrinkles add character and dimension to portraits. I usually soften their appearance in editing so the lines aren’t as deep or noticeable. But of course, I can edit this to the client’s personal preference though.





Before You Request Heavy Portrait Retouching


I know it's easy to fall into a comparison trap, and want to remove every blemish and wrinkle. But before you request heavy retouching, consider this first.


When you think about someone you love, you don’t think about their wrinkles or imperfections. You only see the person you love.


Please keep this in mind regarding your own portraits. They should look like the version you’ll be remembered by: polished but not void of all imperfection.


Since printed photographs last forever, and we stare at them when they’re on display, I do smooth out details someone might not love about themselves. That’s why every portrait session with me includes complimentary portrait retouching - without asking for it. I provide this service to help you look like the best version of yourself.





A Wise Man Once Told Me


My dad studied photography in the days of film and darkrooms. He didn’t have the luxury of quickly removing items after the photo was taken. He had to capture everything as close to perfect before clicking the shutter.


His take on digital portrait retouching is this, “Would you intentionally put something there? If you wouldn’t put it there, then it’s okay to take it out.”